Integrating New Work From Home Hires

Looking for practical tips and guidelines? Click here to view Marsh’s “Returning People to the Workplace Safely: A Practical Guide for Managing COVID-19” in pdf format. See below for our selection of informative tips, videos, and articles! TED Series, “The Way We Work”, TED. https://www.ted.com/series/the_way_we_work.Kurter, Heidi Lynne. “4 Ways to Onboard New Hires Quickly Without Harming the Employee Experience”, Forbes.com, 23 Apr 2020. https://www.forbes.com/sites/heidilynnekurter/2020/04/23/4-ways-to-onboard-new-hires-quickly-without-harming-the-employee-experience/#648249d74017.hronboard, “7 Creative Ideas to Make your Employee Onboarding Amazing”, hronboard.me, 2020. https://hronboard.me/blog/onboarding-ideas/.Stephenson, Jessica. “5 Pro Tips for Quickly Pivoting to a Virtual Employee Onboarding Process”, ExactHire.com, 6 Apr, 2020. https://www.exacthire.com/blog/hiring-process/5-tips-pivoting-virtual-employee-onboarding-process/.Moss, Kevin, & Manzo, Sona. “Considerations to support delivering an exceptional onboarding experience during business disruption”, Human Resources Today, 29 Apr 2020....
Marketing your business as a recruitment strategy

Marketing your business as a recruitment strategy

Have you ever looked at the journey a jobseeker goes on when trying to apply for a job with your company? Where do they go to find opportunities? What does this process look like? And finally what messages are you providing them along the way? Clarity is a big issue in the job market. It can be unclear to the talent where they should start looking for opportunities within your business. Should they go to your web site and send an email to your generic email address; should they engage with a recruiter or search job boards and social media hoping you are going to post there? Helping people understand where you hire is vital, even when you aren’t hiring. Some brands may have a blank careers page, an email address or a ‘check back soon’ message, with no focus on selling your brand to these jobseekers. Forcing talented people to either keep checking back or give up and send in an application to an email address, never to be heard of again. This becomes a frustrating procedure for talent as they try separate themselves from the crowd. From a business perspective it’s a missed data capturing opportunity for your next hiring period. This lack of focus with in-house recruitment generally is due to the cost of acquiring or managing technology. Most companies would love the ability to present their brand and culture to people who express an interest in a career with them but after prioritizing their budget it often becomes lost by the wayside. In order to attract better talent, recruitment is now about marketing your jobs...
Want to ask for a raise?

Want to ask for a raise?

Here’s the first question you need to ask yourself: Why do you think you should get this raise? Consider the value you bring to your employer and why you merit an increased salary. What have you done since the last time your pay went up to warrant a pay raise? If you have brought in more business, taken on additional responsibilities or done especially well on a particular project, you already have some evidence to present to your employer. Be as specific as possible. Have you researched your market value? Do you know your value in the market? Research how raises are calculated in your organisation, perhaps by talking to your HR department. This will help you have a stronger case to put to your employer. Choose your timing to ask carefully Don’t pick a time when your boss is in the middle of something big, or a problem has emerged in the office. Also if you can time your request to coincide with a performance review that would be much better. Book a meeting with them for a time when you know you’ll have their full attention. In your calendar invite, detail what you would like to discuss, so that they have time to prepare before the meeting. Negotiation is key Be ready to negotiate, at length if necessary, and be clear on how much you are willing to compromise and why you deserve the higher salary. Remain professional During the meeting it is important to keep your emotions at bay. Although you may have strong feelings, especially if you feel you have been unfairly treated compared to...
Grow your career without managing people

Grow your career without managing people

Not being – or wanting to be – a people manager doesn’t have to mean your career progression is limited.  Depending on your skillset and personality, managing people may not necessarily be the best way to progress your career. There are many non-people management routes. Our suggestions? Be an expert within your field Become an undeniable expert in your field. Take advantage of every learning opportunity available, whether by staying up-to-date with all the latest trends or technologies, finding a mentor or attending a professional course. Seeking to grow your knowledge needs to become a habit, rather than a one-off task. Your area of expertise – like all professional fields – will continue change and evolve, and if you want to stay relevant and in the loop, you must commit to being consistently inquisitive and keen to learn more. Grow your reputation Look for opportunities to market your expertise both inside your existing organization and across your wider industry or network. You should be constantly adding to your resume and professional profile as you go along. There are also other ways you can actively enhance your professional reputation: Promote yourself on social media: Connect with the right people and begin building your reputation online. Share relevant content and get involved in industry forum discussions. Starting a blog is another good way to share your expert insights and demonstrate your knowledge in a particular area and is a good way to build a targeted following. Seek out speaking opportunities: Get out there and share your knowledge face-to-face. Look out for opportunities to speak or present at upcoming conferences, team meetings or...
Creating an effective job description

Creating an effective job description

Creating job descriptions can sometimes seem like a daunting task. Here are some useful tips on putting together an effective job description that attracts the right talent to your organization: Get the basics right Your job title should match the actual description, responsibilities, and level of seniority or experience required in the job. This will ensure you’re attracting the most relevant talent. Having an accurate title will also improve the searchability of your job. Salary is one of the biggest motivations for applying for a new position. Despite how appealing your position might be, some of the best talent could quickly pass by if you don’t indicate the level of compensation. At the very least, include a salary bracket to allow for some negotiation. The inclusion of a salary is also helpful to potential applicants as it provides a guide to the level of the position. Know the difference; responsibilities, requirements and preferences Focus on the most important aspects of the role and be detailed about what these would entail, rather than giving a lengthy but unspecific list. Also be sure to differentiate between what is required in a candidate and what is simply preferred, otherwise you might risk missing out on exceptional candidates just because they don’t tick some of the less important boxes. Inputting keywords and the skills required will optimize your job posting in search engines so that you can find the most relevant talent. This is especially helpful if you use a title that fits with your company culture but is not the most common title for the position. For example, if you choose ‘Sales Superstar’ instead of ‘Business...