Want to ask for a raise?

Want to ask for a raise?

Here’s the first question you need to ask yourself: Why do you think you should get this raise? Consider the value you bring to your employer and why you merit an increased salary. What have you done since the last time your pay went up to warrant a pay raise? If you have brought in more business, taken on additional responsibilities or done especially well on a particular project, you already have some evidence to present to your employer. Be as specific as possible. Have you researched your market value? Do you know your value in the market? Research how raises are calculated in your organisation, perhaps by talking to your HR department. This will help you have a stronger case to put to your employer. Choose your timing to ask carefully Don’t pick a time when your boss is in the middle of something big, or a problem has emerged in the office. Also if you can time your request to coincide with a performance review that would be much better. Book a meeting with them for a time when you know you’ll have their full attention. In your calendar invite, detail what you would like to discuss, so that they have time to prepare before the meeting. Negotiation is key Be ready to negotiate, at length if necessary, and be clear on how much you are willing to compromise and why you deserve the higher salary. Remain professional During the meeting it is important to keep your emotions at bay. Although you may have strong feelings, especially if you feel you have been unfairly treated compared to...
Grow your career without managing people

Grow your career without managing people

Not being – or wanting to be – a people manager doesn’t have to mean your career progression is limited.  Depending on your skillset and personality, managing people may not necessarily be the best way to progress your career. There are many non-people management routes. Our suggestions? Be an expert within your field Become an undeniable expert in your field. Take advantage of every learning opportunity available, whether by staying up-to-date with all the latest trends or technologies, finding a mentor or attending a professional course. Seeking to grow your knowledge needs to become a habit, rather than a one-off task. Your area of expertise – like all professional fields – will continue change and evolve, and if you want to stay relevant and in the loop, you must commit to being consistently inquisitive and keen to learn more. Grow your reputation Look for opportunities to market your expertise both inside your existing organization and across your wider industry or network. You should be constantly adding to your resume and professional profile as you go along. There are also other ways you can actively enhance your professional reputation: Promote yourself on social media: Connect with the right people and begin building your reputation online. Share relevant content and get involved in industry forum discussions. Starting a blog is another good way to share your expert insights and demonstrate your knowledge in a particular area and is a good way to build a targeted following. Seek out speaking opportunities: Get out there and share your knowledge face-to-face. Look out for opportunities to speak or present at upcoming conferences, team meetings or...
What to tell your recruiter

What to tell your recruiter

Your recruiter’s main responsibility is to support you in your job search through spotting suitable roles, seeking out companies they think you’d be a good fit for, interview preparation and providing you with expert advice whenever you need it. For the above to work, you need to provide your recruiter with all the information they need from the beginning. Why you are looking for a new job Your reasons for wanting to leave a role could be anything; the culture, the lack of progression opportunities, your boss’s management style, the company size or aspects of the role itself. Whatever it is, relay this information in a positive and professional way. The recruiter will keep this information confidential, using it only to eliminate unsuitable roles that they may have otherwise offered to you. What is your ideal job description Let them know what would your ideal job description look like. Consider the below: Key responsibilities Write down the key responsibilities of your ideal role, based upon what you enjoy about your current role as well as in previous jobs. You should also let the recruiter know how much you want to progress within your perfect role, and how this fits with your wider career goals. Strengths and weaknesses Next, be clear on what your unique selling points are, identifying the hard and soft skills which suit your hypothetical responsibilities, and the areas in which you may need to upskill. Your recruiter can advise you on how to bridge any skills gaps, and may know of opportunities that can support you in doing this. Dream company to work for Everybody’s definition...
Soft skills sought by employers

Soft skills sought by employers

The world of work is changing at a rapid pace. Innovations in the digital realm are continuously altering the way we operate. Therefore employers now want their staff to demonstrate new skills to succeed in the face of today’s challenges that perhaps the last wave of employees did not encounter. Below are some soft skills that are most in demand. Willingness to learn A willingness to learn is the most requested soft skill in the world of work today. Hiring managers want the ideal candidate to be proactive and take the initiative to continuously develop themselves as well as communicate this to others. Examples of this: listening to webinars and podcasts on your commute looking at what the competition is doing keeping an eye on customer feedback recommending news articles to existing colleagues creating email alerts for yourself around topics of interest Regardless of the industry, a desire to stay on top of current trends and changes relevant to your profession is valued by businesses both large and small. This also shows that you are self-aware. Understanding customers Technology has helped evolve consumer behaviour. Businesses are now steered towards customer experience and behavioural patterns of how users engage with their products and services. This is why organizations now require someone who can keep up with these technological changes within their sector and suggest new ways for the business to adapt. Adapting to change Employers want people who can move out of their comfort zone and see change as an opportunity for growth and innovation. Having the ability to accept and adapt is important as adjusting to a new environment...
How to find the right organizational fit

How to find the right organizational fit

When actively job hunting, organizational fit is often overlooked. Whether you choose to work at a start-up or not-for-profit organization is very much dependent on individual preferences. Each tend to have characteristics that might make them a better ‘fit’ for different people. Here’s a breakdown of each: Start-ups Typically at start-ups, career progression can depend on how quickly the company grows, and this can make it more difficult for professionals to move up the career ladder. A proactive approach and flexible attitude is often needed. This initial lack of structure is often what makes start-ups drivers of innovation and creativity. Start-ups can offer a hierarchical structure whilst also allowing opportunities for inter-departmental collaboration. Many start-ups also offer equity to professionals coming in at ground level. Public sector or not-for-profit Although not traditionally known for innovation, many public-sector organizations are undergoing a digital transformation in a bid to drive efficiency and as a result are changing that perception. Opportunities for flexible working alongside a less obviously competitive working atmosphere can make the public sector attractive to many professionals looking for steady progression and the opportunity to improve the lives of others. Corporates Known for being proactive with training and investment and usually demonstrating an international presence, corporates traditionally offer clear departmental structure and linear career progression pathways.. Better pay and a more comprehensive benefits package may also be offered. Although often having a reputation for overly rigid processes, many corporates now operate more agile working practices, and within the realms of HR, diversity and inclusion and mental wellbeing are taking much greater precedence. Every workplace, whether a corporate, start-up or...
Love it or leave it – Make the most of your job

Love it or leave it – Make the most of your job

We all have days where our jobs frustrate us, but they should be the exception rather than the rule. Your job should challenge and engage you in some way every day. If you find you’re only working for a paycheck and not liking any aspect of your job, then you should seriously consider a move. So how do you figure this all out? Assess the job itself: Do you feel you’ve reached a plateau in your role or has your role evolved over time so that it no longer resembles the job you applied for in the first place? If so, that’s an easy fix. Either have a chat with your boss and see if it is possible to get back to the original role or start looking elsewhere to get that feeling of excitement back. Are you up to speed in your field? Getting complacent is a major reason why most people stop loving their jobs. Thinking you know everything about your job can sometimes mean that you get a little lazy and are no longer actively trying to keep up to date with new developments. Make a habit of reading trade publications or specialist websites. Set up alerts that can give you insights into the latest developments within your field and/or industry. Focus on what you actually like about your job: We don’t always have the luxury of picking and choosing certain aspects of our roles. There is however a way of increasing your focus on those that you like and enjoy. Talk to your employer about focusing on this particular aspect of your role. However, bear in mind that it...