Creating Work-Life Balance

No matter what career you’re in or how many additional commitments you have, creating a healthy balance between work and play is absolutely essential when it comes to leading a happy and productive lifestyle. But it’s not always easy – especially if you have a particularly demanding career.   Listen to your body Many professions require a lot of time and effort, and sometimes large amounts of downtime just isn’t possible if you’re determined to do well. But it’s all about finding that balance. By recognizing your own individual triggers and understanding when you’re overdoing it, you’ll be able to recognize the early warning signs before you start burning out. Don’t ignore the signs. Feeling tired? Sleep. Getting ill? Take a sick day. There’s nothing wrong with giving yourself a break. Just make it’s on your terms.   Understand that balance is good Creating a good balance between your work life and your personal life will allow you to be more productive in both areas. Work-life balance doesn’t always refer to a solid line between work and play. Whether it’s by working from home, when you need quiet space for a project, or dedicating time to group brainstorm sessions where collaboration is necessary – creating your own balance between teamwork and head-down work is equally essential to achieving productivity in all aspects of your job. Keep your life a balanced amount of work, recreation, and rest in order to stay fully functional.   Remember what it is that you like about work Always dreading work? Don’t know what a weekend is? Knowing when to switch off is often the...

How to Prove You Deserve a Promotion This Year

Here are some tips to help you prove to your boss that you deserve a promotion: Communicate It’s important to have an open communication channel with your employer. If you’ve previously asked for a promotion and have been declined because “you’re not ready yet,” ask your boss why they think you’re not ready and what you should do to improve. The truth is that every industry and boss have different standards or requirements. When you know what they’re looking for, and you’re working toward being that person, only then can you prove that you deserve a promotion. Choose your words carefully. Instead of “I want a promotion because I deserve it” or “I need the money” lean more towards “I believe I could bring much more benefit to the organization with a more senior position because…” afterwards, continue with your reasoning. Identify and showcase the profits The first thing you should do is identify the profitable “trends” you’ve supported, promoted or initiated. Emphasize what you’ve brought to the table as an employee—make a comprehensive list highlighting all your relevant accomplishments and all that the company has gained from your expertise. Back your claims with stats Your argument, in this case, cannot be totally subjective or emotional, it should be based on facts and statistical figures. Produce a professionally formatted document featuring the profits the company has gained solely from your contribution. Consistency is key here. Having one or two good reports or well-managed projects will not have the same effect as a consistent 6-month productive contribution. Having a consistently good file will help you address the situation more effectively....

Regain Career Momentum

  Every job has its ups and downs, moments where you are getting everything right and then a period where nothing goes the way you had planned. Here are some tools to help you get out of your performance rut and get back on track: Reassess where you are in terms of your goals Take some quiet time with a pen and a piece of paper to reflect. Consider asking yourself some of the following questions: What are my most recent goals that I set myself? Are these goals still the same? If not, how have they changed? What’s important to me? How is my performance measured? Be realistic Analyze your current situation to try and understand why you aren’t reaching your goals. How did you get here and what’s the underlying cause? It’s really important to be honest with yourself here, so you can identify the reality of the situation, and try to pinpoint why exactly your performance is suffering. Ask yourself: When did I last reach my goals, and what did I do differently to what I am doing now? Which obstacles do I find myself facing on a regular basis? What is the cause of these obstacles? How do they hinder me from meeting my goals? How do I react to them? What is my current approach to problem-solving? What is open to you? Set a new route for yourself and get back on the road towards success. Look at every challenge you are facing and how you can rise to each one. Ask yourself: What are the options for overcoming each obstacle? Who can support...

Navigating Major Life Transitions

Originally published at movethisworld.com.   It feels like the world has changed so much in the last ten years, let alone the last 3,000, when Heraclitus uttered the first iteration of, “change is the only constant in life.” Many changes can feel daunting, scary or overwhelming — like preparing for first-time motherhood while writing a curriculum overhaul and leading organizational growth from California to Texas to Tennessee. Let me tell you straight from the heart: it’s been an incredibly challenging time. I’ve had to adjust my focus, work with my team (my team in the office and my team in my husband), and develop new strategies for success — at work and at home. But I also feel that I could not be more prepared for such a herculean task; in fact, I’ve been preparing for this every day of my life. Flexibility. Openness. Empathy. Forgiveness. These are all core elements of our work at Move This World, and we practice them individually and as a team every day of the week. We practice laughter. We meditate. We workout. We Move This Day. We work, and we play. It’s what has allowed us to change locations, shift our model, and work around the world while staying focused on our greater mission. At the end of the day, we don’t really know when major transitions are going to take place. We might have hints or ideas, but life comes at you quickly. The only way to prepare for the inevitable is to be proactive, to work the mental muscles every day. We need to be flexible. We need to be open...

Dealing with an Overwhelming Workload

 When the work starts piling up it’s always tempting to give up and take a nap instead. Sometimes when there are way too many tasks demanding your attention, it looks far more appealing to forget about all of them and take a break from it all. But attractive as it may sound, this procrastination isn’t sustainable. Here are our top tips to help you tackle the workload: Divide and conquer Divide bigger tasks into smaller, more manageable chunks and then deal with each of them as a separate task. This will make it look a lot less daunting and far more do-able. It will also give you a clearer picture of what exactly you are supposed to do and how to go about accomplishing it. Prioritize Prioritizing is key. As mentioned above, breaking up larger assignments into smaller portions can help you to begin forming a list that consists of what needs to be done in order of priority. It is worth the time and effort to dedicate a few minutes to prioritize and organize your to-do list. This way you will be able to give enough attention to each task, thereby ensuring you not only finish the job, but also do it well. It might then be a good idea to start off with something small and easy to get the momentum going.  Just get started Deciding where to start is often difficult if your to-do list is cluttered with several small, but equally important tasks. Instead of tackling several tasks simultaneously, it is better to just select one and finish it before starting on the next. If...

How to Balance Your Personal and Professional Self

Here are our top tips to secure your dream job in 2019: During the interview stage, people often ask us how to strike the right balance between standing out from the crowd and putting their best professional profile forward.
When an opportunity comes along, showing your personality is certainly a top priority to every hiring manager. 
Here are some tips to help you during the interview process: What is the company culture? Ask your recruitment consultant, ask your friends, look at the website. Most, if not all, companies will have some information on what is important to them. If not, the language and style of marketing will give you a good indication of the type of message they want to put out to their clients.

When you first visit the office for an interview, observe the behaviour of the employees and managers. Are they walking around and socializing or does everyone stay at their desks working? Does the environment seem structured or open? Use your skills. When you are in interviewing or meeting with your hiring manager, use an example of a skillset from your own personal life. Use something that you can decipher the reaction and interest by the company representatives in the room. If you play a sport or have been involved in physical activities, you can use examples of resilience or teamwork. Here you may spark an interest that can lead to further conversation to show what you love to do in your spare time.   If in doubt – leave it out! You should always start at zero on the scale, you are a professional and your skills and qualifications are up for...