How to find the right organizational fit

How to find the right organizational fit

When actively job hunting, organizational fit is often overlooked. Whether you choose to work at a start-up or not-for-profit organization is very much dependent on individual preferences. Each tend to have characteristics that might make them a better ‘fit’ for different people. Here’s a breakdown of each: Start-ups Typically at start-ups, career progression can depend on how quickly the company grows, and this can make it more difficult for professionals to move up the career ladder. A proactive approach and flexible attitude is often needed. This initial lack of structure is often what makes start-ups drivers of innovation and creativity. Start-ups can offer a hierarchical structure whilst also allowing opportunities for inter-departmental collaboration. Many start-ups also offer equity to professionals coming in at ground level. Public sector or not-for-profit Although not traditionally known for innovation, many public-sector organizations are undergoing a digital transformation in a bid to drive efficiency and as a result are changing that perception. Opportunities for flexible working alongside a less obviously competitive working atmosphere can make the public sector attractive to many professionals looking for steady progression and the opportunity to improve the lives of others. Corporates Known for being proactive with training and investment and usually demonstrating an international presence, corporates traditionally offer clear departmental structure and linear career progression pathways.. Better pay and a more comprehensive benefits package may also be offered. Although often having a reputation for overly rigid processes, many corporates now operate more agile working practices, and within the realms of HR, diversity and inclusion and mental wellbeing are taking much greater precedence. Every workplace, whether a corporate, start-up or...
Love it or leave it – Make the most of your job

Love it or leave it – Make the most of your job

We all have days where our jobs frustrate us, but they should be the exception rather than the rule. Your job should challenge and engage you in some way every day. If you find you’re only working for a paycheck and not liking any aspect of your job, then you should seriously consider a move. So how do you figure this all out? Assess the job itself: Do you feel you’ve reached a plateau in your role or has your role evolved over time so that it no longer resembles the job you applied for in the first place? If so, that’s an easy fix. Either have a chat with your boss and see if it is possible to get back to the original role or start looking elsewhere to get that feeling of excitement back. Are you up to speed in your field? Getting complacent is a major reason why most people stop loving their jobs. Thinking you know everything about your job can sometimes mean that you get a little lazy and are no longer actively trying to keep up to date with new developments. Make a habit of reading trade publications or specialist websites. Set up alerts that can give you insights into the latest developments within your field and/or industry. Focus on what you actually like about your job: We don’t always have the luxury of picking and choosing certain aspects of our roles. There is however a way of increasing your focus on those that you like and enjoy. Talk to your employer about focusing on this particular aspect of your role. However, bear in mind that it...
Creating Work-Life Balance

Creating Work-Life Balance

No matter what career you’re in or how many additional commitments you have, creating a healthy  work-life balance is absolutely essential when it comes to leading a happy and productive lifestyle. But balancing work and play it’s not always easy – especially if you have a particularly demanding career. Listen to your body Many professions require a lot of time and effort, and sometimes large amounts of downtime just isn’t possible if you’re determined to do well. But it’s all about finding that balance. By recognizing your own individual triggers and understanding when you’re overdoing it, you’ll be able to recognize the early warning signs before you start burning out. Don’t ignore the signs. Feeling tired? Sleep. Getting ill? Take a sick day. There’s nothing wrong with giving yourself a break. Just make it’s on your terms.  Understand that balance is good Creating a good balance between your work life and your personal life will allow you to be more productive in both areas. Work-life balance doesn’t always refer to a solid line between work and play. Whether it’s by working from home, when you need quiet space for a project, or dedicating time to group brainstorm sessions where collaboration is necessary – creating your own balance between teamwork and head-down work is equally essential to achieving productivity in all aspects of your job. Keep your life a balanced amount of work, recreation, and rest in order to stay fully functional. Remember what it is that you like about work Always dreading work? Don’t know what a weekend is? Knowing when to switch off is often the best way...
Simple Tips to Deal with Stress in the Workplace

Simple Tips to Deal with Stress in the Workplace

Feeling a bit snowed under at work? Well, you’re certainly not alone. It is, however, a good idea to have some stress-busting tools for when deadlines arrive or tasks seem to be mounting at work. Here are 4 simple tips to help you deal with stress that you can easily put into practice at your desk: Take a moment to breathe. If you’re coming out of a tense meeting and need to clear your head, or perhaps you’re nervous about a presentation coming up, deep breaths can calm your nerves. Inhale slowly through your nose for a count of 5, then exhale through your mouth for 5. Repeat as you need. Write it down to get it out. Sometimes it can be difficult to juggle priorities, leaving you feeling overwhelmed by the amount left to be done. By writing everything down, you can immediately visualize what tasks need to be tackled and when. By getting them out of your head and onto paper, you’ll make them feel much more manageable. Ticking things off as they are completed with also help you feel much more productive. Practice self-compassion. Remember to go easy on yourself. When you get into a negative thought spiral about work-related issues, ask yourself this: “What would I say to a friend if I heard them say this about themselves?” We’re often our own harshest critics. Don’t be tempted to skip meals. Coffee isn’t breakfast! Your diet doesn’t just have a physical impact, it has an impact on your mental health too. A good rule of thumb is to go for protein-heavy meals in the morning, such as eggs or Greek...
How to Prove You Deserve a Promotion This Year

How to Prove You Deserve a Promotion This Year

Here are some tips to help you prove to your boss that you deserve a promotion: Communicate It’s important to have an open communication channel with your employer. If you’ve previously asked for a promotion and have been declined because “you’re not ready yet,” ask your boss why they think you’re not ready and what you should do to improve. The truth is that every industry and boss have different standards or requirements. When you know what they’re looking for, and you’re working toward being that person, only then can you prove that you deserve a promotion. Choose your words carefully. Instead of “I want a promotion because I deserve it” or “I need the money” lean more towards “I believe I could bring much more benefit to the organization with a more senior position because…” afterwards, continue with your reasoning. Identify and showcase the profits The first thing you should do is identify the profitable “trends” you’ve supported, promoted or initiated. Emphasize what you’ve brought to the table as an employee—make a comprehensive list highlighting all your relevant accomplishments and all that the company has gained from your expertise. Back your claims with stats Your argument, in this case, cannot be totally subjective or emotional, it should be based on facts and statistical figures. Produce a professionally formatted document featuring the profits the company has gained solely from your contribution. Consistency is key here. Having one or two good reports or well-managed projects will not have the same effect as a consistent 6-month productive contribution. Having a consistently good file will help you address the situation more effectively....
Regain Career Momentum

Regain Career Momentum

Every job has its ups and downs, moments where you are getting everything right and then a period where nothing goes the way you had planned. Here are some tools to help you get out of your performance rut and regain your career momentum: Reassess where you are in terms of your goals Take some quiet time with a pen and a piece of paper to reflect. Consider asking yourself some of the following questions: What are my most recent goals that I set myself? Are these goals still the same? If not, how have they changed? What’s important to me? How is my performance measured? Be realistic Analyze your current situation to try and understand why you aren’t reaching your goals. How did you get here and what’s the underlying cause? It’s really important to be honest with yourself here, so you can identify the reality of the situation, and try to pinpoint why exactly your performance is suffering. Ask yourself: When did I last reach my goals, and what did I do differently to what I am doing now? Which obstacles do I find myself facing on a regular basis? What is the cause of these obstacles? How do they hinder me from meeting my goals? How do I react to them? What is my current approach to problem-solving? What is open to you? Set a new route for yourself and get back on the road towards success. Look at every challenge you are facing and how you can rise to each one. Ask yourself: What are the options for overcoming each obstacle? Who can support me...