Regain Career Momentum

Regain Career Momentum

Every job has its ups and downs, moments where you are getting everything right and then a period where nothing goes the way you had planned. Here are some tools to help you get out of your performance rut and regain your career momentum: Reassess where you are in terms of your goals Take some quiet time with a pen and a piece of paper to reflect. Consider asking yourself some of the following questions: What are my most recent goals that I set myself? Are these goals still the same? If not, how have they changed? What’s important to me? How is my performance measured? Be realistic Analyze your current situation to try and understand why you aren’t reaching your goals. How did you get here and what’s the underlying cause? It’s really important to be honest with yourself here, so you can identify the reality of the situation, and try to pinpoint why exactly your performance is suffering. Ask yourself: When did I last reach my goals, and what did I do differently to what I am doing now? Which obstacles do I find myself facing on a regular basis? What is the cause of these obstacles? How do they hinder me from meeting my goals? How do I react to them? What is my current approach to problem-solving? What is open to you? Set a new route for yourself and get back on the road towards success. Look at every challenge you are facing and how you can rise to each one. Ask yourself: What are the options for overcoming each obstacle? Who can support me...
Managing an Overwhelming Workload

Managing an Overwhelming Workload

Sometimes when there are way too many tasks demanding your attention, it looks far more appealing to forget about all of them and take a break from it all. But attractive as it may sound, this procrastination isn’t sustainable. Here are our top tips to help you tackle the workload: Divide and conquer Divide bigger tasks into smaller, more manageable chunks and then deal with each of them as a separate task. This will make it look a lot less daunting and far more do-able. It will also give you a clearer picture of what exactly you are supposed to do and how to go about accomplishing it. Prioritize Prioritizing is key. As mentioned above, breaking up larger assignments into smaller portions can help you to begin forming a list that consists of what needs to be done in order of priority. It is worth the time and effort to dedicate a few minutes to prioritize and organize your to-do list. This way you will be able to give enough attention to each task, thereby ensuring you not only finish the job, but also do it well. It might then be a good idea to start off with something small and easy to get the momentum going.  Just get started Deciding where to start is often difficult if your to-do list is cluttered with several small, but equally important tasks. Instead of tackling several tasks simultaneously, it is better to just select one and finish it before starting on the next. If each task is equally important then just select one at random. Getting started is often the hardest...
How to Balance Your Personal and Professional Self

How to Balance Your Personal and Professional Self

During the interview stage, people often ask us how to strike the right balance between standing out from the crowd and putting their best professional profile forward.
 When an opportunity comes along, showing your personality is certainly a top priority to every hiring manager. 
Here are some tips to help you balance professionalism with personality during the interview process: What is the company culture? Ask your recruitment consultant, ask your friends, look at the website. Most, if not all, companies will have some information on what is important to them. If not, the language and style of marketing will give you a good indication of the type of message they want to put out to their clients.

 When you first visit the office for an interview, observe the behaviour of the employees and managers. Are they walking around and socializing or does everyone stay at their desks working? Does the environment seem structured or open? Use your skills. When you are in interviewing or meeting with your hiring manager, use an example of a skill set from your own personal life. Use something that you can decipher the reaction and interest by the company representatives in the room. If you play a sport or have been involved in volunteer activities, you can use examples of resilience or teamwork. Here you may spark an interest that can lead to further conversation to show what you love to do in your spare time. If in doubt – leave it out! You should always start at zero on the scale, you are a professional and your skills and qualifications are up for discussion. You can test the water...
Resilience in the Workplace

Resilience in the Workplace

Workplaces bring many challenges – excessive workload, lack of autonomy, organizational restructuring and performance scrutiny, just to name a few. Building resilience in the workplace enables us to respond to the challenges that are just the nature of work. Having the right attitude is a great help. Family, friends and a great support network is next. And finally, having a purpose is crucial in becoming more resilient. When you are stressed or finding it difficult to “cope”, this is when you revert back to your core values. These values or priorities have been developed over time and evolve as we transition throughout our lives. There are a few questions you can ask yourself when attempting to establish your priorities, such as “I do this because?’’ and “I work hard because?’’. Defining yourself and your core values is key to being able to complete these statements. Equally, building resilience can help you cope with stress and adversity in the workplace by giving you the ability to deal with change, mistakes, and the poor performance of others as well as yourself. Here are some tips on how to build resilience in the workplace: invest and believe in yourself identify your strengths learn from experience maintain perspective accept and anticipate change work towards a goal with a sense of purpose There are, of course, some situations which are out of our control but it is how we react to them which matters most. Resilience is like a muscle, you can build and develop it in order to draw on it when you need to. 
The real risk in terms of resilience is simply doing...
Tips for a Phone Interview

Tips for a Phone Interview

You applied for that job. Great. Now you have been invited to participate in a phone interview. This is often the first step of the interview process. It gives employers the opportunity to gauge whether you would be a suitable fit for the role before moving forward any further. Here are some of our top tips to help you ace your phone interview: Preparation is key: 
A phone interview should not be overlooked so make sure you prepare. You should be comfortable talking through your resume and experience. Prep for questions like “why do you want to work at this company?”, “what is your greatest achievement?”, “tell me about a time you face a challenge and how you overcame it?”. Tailoring your answers is the best possible way to ensure you are satisfying what the interviewer is asking and positioning yourself as an ideal candidate. Eliminate distractions: 
You need to concentrate a little more during a phone interview so make sure you create or are in a quiet environment. Find a quiet place for the call where ideally, there are no distractions. Make sure you have any relevant materials like your resume nearby for easy access. Speak clearly: 
It is important to present yourself in a professional manner from the first “Hello” to the minute you hang up. Be sure the interviewer can hear you. Speak clearly and directly into the phone. Take your time and consider your breathing. Taking a breath between when the interviewer asks you a question and when you start answering it really allows you to think about what you’re going to say. Listen and engage
: Talk, but do...
Resigning from Your Job: Our Must-Read Guide

Resigning from Your Job: Our Must-Read Guide

Resigning from your job can be the toughest part of the process when starting a new role. Is there a right way to resign? Not necessarily, but we do have some advice to help ensure it runs as smoothly as possible. Understand your company’s policies on resignation Check in your current contract with regards to clauses entered. If your new start date is in 4 weeks but your current notice period is 2 weeks, wait until 2 weeks as per your contract. You may have a gardening leave period if you are moving to a direct competitor so be aware that you may need to leave the premises almost immediately due to conflict of interest. When is the ‘right’ time? Before resigning from your job, wait until you have received official confirmation of your new job offer  – in other words, wait until your contract has been signed and you have written proof. Hand your notice in as soon as you can once your new position is confirmed. The more notice you can give your current employer the better, as this gives them time to find a replacement. Speak with your line manager first and foremost Your line manager is usually the person you worked most closely with. For this very reason they should be the person you speak with first. Ideally, book a private meeting room with them on a Friday afternoon and be prepared for a positive or a negative reaction. You cannot anticipate how they will react so it’s better to have planned for both scenarios. What to say? Plan what you want to say. Get a...